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Acorn 1976 



Mil. 






"We have nothing to (ear for the 
iture except as we shal 
way the Lord has led ui 



Acorn Publications 1976 

Oakwood College 



Table of Contents 

Black Adventism in Retrospect 

Happenings 

Sports 

Classes 




Wilbur Young. Mari-Edi Hayes 
Editors 



Every 
Voice 
And 





Earth 

And 

Heaven 

Ring With The Harmony Of Liberty. 





Let Our 

Rise High 

Listening 



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Let It 

Loud As The 



Rejoicing 
As The 
! Skies: 



L^iiaiifeiS5cL«fei!Si^'f^^^ 



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Resound 
Rolling Sea, 





UNTSVILLE ALABAMA 35806 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Since 1896, Oakwood has been serving Christ, the church, the nation, and the 
world through education. Its principle objective continues to be that of training 
and producing black SDA christian leaders for the service of the church and 
around the world, for the redemption of men and the transformation of society. 
It attempts to fulfill its distinctive role and mission by providing qualified young 
people with a first rate liberal arts education, offering the bachelor's degree in 
thirteen areas of study. 

At Oakwood a sharp distinction is made between the imparting of knowledge to 
the mind, and education which involves shaping the whole being-body, mind and 
character. Oakwood neither compromises its commitment to academic excellence 
nor separates education apart from Divine revelation-the true source of knowledge. 
It strives for highest academic objectives in conjunction with a vital relationship 
and experience with Jesus Christ. The Bible is taught without apolog\- as the 
inspired and infallible word of God, thus giving a solid religious base. 

Because of its religious and academic traditions, Oakwood has achieved a position 
of strength, a real force for leadership among religious colleges. The story o:" 
Oakwood graduates is a story of leadership and service. They are now found 
serving around the world. 

At Oakwood College the student is the central element; he is our reason for 
existence, the object of the entire program, the focus of the total effort. 

Oakwood believes that student centerness enables the students to find self-identity , 
self reliance and self-fulfillment during the course of thiCir college career. 

The college constantly seeks to enrich the quality of its service to the student. 
This means the stengthening of the present areas of study, the adding of new and 
essential areas, and the providing of adequate facilities as called for by the 
quality and nature of instruction undertaken. This tlirough the years lias required 
financial outlay and human sacrifice on the part of administration, faculty, students 
and constituency, and will continue to do so. 

The achievement of the college through its dedicated graduates has amply 
justified the outlay in money and human effort. Oakwood has done and continues 
to do her noble work in a noble way. May every success attend !ier as she 
courageously presses on in the accomplishment of her heaven-ordained role. 




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Black Adventism 



Retrospect 




Elder W.W. Fordham is the major editorial consultant for the research material that 
appears in this section on Black Adventism in retrospect. 



This is an early baptism. 



In 1894 there were approximately fifty colored Seventh-day Ad- 
ventists in the United States. The work began to develop under the 
strong evangehstic preaching of such men as L. Shaefe, John 
Manns, Sidney Scott, J. Humphrey, J. Lawrence, G. Peters, M. 
Strachan, T. Buckner and M. Nunez. 

In 1909 the membership had reached nine hundred, and in order 
to advance the work, a different form of organization had to be in- 
troduced. Consequently, at the General Conference Session in 
1909 the North American Negro Department was organized, and 
W.H. Green was elected as the first secretary of the department. 
Elder A.G. Daniels, president of the General Conference, gave the 
following explanation as the basis for the creation of this depart- 
ment: "I believe that under this direct effort, we shall see the work 
in behalf of the colored people of this country go forward with 
greater success than we have ever seen it before. The department 
will have a secretary, an executive committee, the same as the other 
departments, and on this committee there will be a fair representa- 
tion of the field. The committee will then meet and plan its work, 
and outline its policy for the future the same as do the other de- 
partment committees. Their work will be to carry forward the evan- 
gehcal work among the colored people. They will take up the quest 
of mission schools, church schools, and the higher schools such as 



Huntsville, and will look after them. They will look after the pub- 
hshing hterature as will be best adapted to the people. In fact, they 
will take into consideration all branches of the work." 

The first meeting of the North American Negro Department of 
the General Conference was held at Oakwood Manual Training 
School in Huntsville, Alabama, September 28, 1909. Black leaders 
at that meeting were: W. Green, D. Blake, M. Strachan, T. Branch, 
Sidney Scott, Thomas Murphy, W. Sebastian. On Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 29, it was voted that the headquarters of the North Ameri- 
can Department be located in Huntsville, Alabama. 

In 1918 the membership among America's greatest minority had 
reached 3,000 and at the General Conference Session, the first 
black ever elected to the General Conference Staff was W.H. 
Green, a former lawyer who had argued many cases before the Su- 
preme Court of the United States. However, even though he was 
elected as the first black member of the General Conference, due 
to racial segregation in the United States, as well as in the church, 
it was impossible for him to carry out his duties from the General 
Conference office. 

In 1927 there was a joint committee meeting of the Southeastern, 
Southern and Southwestern Unions' black leaders, which was hejd 
in Nashville, Tennessee. This was the first effort in the Southland 




to recx)gnize black leadership. At this meeting, Elder McElhaney, 
President of the General Conference, was present and recom- 
mended that the Union should separate and formulate specific ac- 
tions that could be voted upon. 

It was voted unanimously by the black leaders that the name of 
all three Unions be changed to read "The Colored Department" 
There was also quite a discussion as to the title of the leading min- 
isters for the colored work; the names of evangelists, secretaries, 
and superintendents were discussed. After considering the names 
and responsibilities from most every angle, it was finally voted 
unanimously by standing that the title for the leading minister of 
the colored department of the Union and each local conference be 
evangelist, and that he would carry the secretarial work of the col- 
ored department. 

"We recommend the adoption and principle of the recommenda- 
tions regarding the organization of the colored work as passed by 
the General Conference of 1926, adapting them to fit the condi- 
tions of the three Southern Unions, recognizing the need of stress- 
ing evangelism in our fields for the colored population, and in view 
of the tact that our resources both in men and money are very lim- 
ited, and beheving that the life and growth of our work among our 
colored behevers depends upon emphasizing evangelism; there- 



fore, RESOLVED, that we urge our colored laborer^ lo u^e iheir 
utmost efforts to carry the message lo all colored people. Then, 
adapting the plan of our colored departmental work in our union 
and local conferences as suggested by the General Conference res- 
olution in Milwaukee, the work of the union and local departmen- 
tal committee be to study and provide for the needs ol' the work tor 
the colored people in harmony with established policy. When ne\\ 
policies are suggested, they must be brought before the Executive 
Committee that the work of the said union or local conference 
evangelist be outlined and directed by the president and committee 
of the respective conferences the same as other laborers: that \ve 
recognize the work of any other department to be the same as it is 
understood to be the work of anv other department: that lull coun- 
sel be had with our colored laborers in planning their work, it being 
distinctly understood that the union of local cont'erence evangelist 
has no administrative authority. We recommend that the General 
Conference recommendation No SO. a> appears m the Review tt 
Herald of June 14, 1926. p. 5. shall be understood to applv to col- 
ored departmental work, and to be earned out onK as finances per- 
mit, and the recommendation referred lo read>: "uhere the devel- 
oping and better prosecution of the \'.ork lor our people requires 
better attention, there should be appointed such assistant secretar- 



Early picture of Pittsburgh congregation 




ies and helpers of the various departments of the several union 
conferences in the South as are required to look after and care for 
the development of the colored work.' " 

Now the irony of this whole situation is the fact that many of 
these recommendations relative to the organization were never 
fully impleted. In 1929 at the Fall Council held in Columbus, OH 
the first major recommendation relative to the organization of the 
black work in the North was voted, referring to the minutes of that 
Aimual Council. 

Recommended: (1) That in each union conference where there 
are as many as five colored believers, except in the Southeastern, 
Southern and Southwestern, a Negro secretary be elected, the sec- 
retary to be a member of the union conference committee. (2) That 
the union secretary together with the secretaries of the South- 
eastern, Southern and Southwestern Union Conferences be invited 
to attend such Autumn Councils as the local conference presidents 
may be called to attend; thus, they would receive the encour- 
agement to be gained by contract with the leaders of our world 
wide work, and would carry it back to the colored churches in their 
fields, the appeals on all our activities throughout the field the 
world around. (3) That these secretaries together with the union 
secretaries together with the union secretaries of the Southeast, 



Southern and Southwestern Unions, and such other persons that 
the General Conference may appoint, would form the General 
Conference Negro Department Advisory Committee. This Com- 
mittee will counsel over matters pertaining to the colored work, 
and at this Annual Council the primary responsibilities of these 
secretaries were outlined as follows: (1) Holding evangelistic efforts 
when advisable. (2) By assisting evangelists with the efforts when 
advisable. (3) By helping to train young preachers and workers. (4) 
By helping to foster real soul-winning work in each of the churches 
and conferences. (5) By cooperaUng in all lines of departmental 
and church acUvities and (6) That where the colored constituency 
in a local conference is sufficiently strong, and is represented by a 
colored minister of experience, we recommend that he be made a 
member of the local conference committee. 

Now this more or less appUed to the Negro constituency in the 
Northern sections of our country. At this Annual Conference, con- 
sideration was given to the previous recommendations that were 
made by the joint committees of the Southern, Southeastern, and 
Southwestern Unions which met in 1827, and these were among 
the actions which were approved: .... (1) That the Negro Com- 
mittee of the local conference be composed as follows: the presi- 
dent of the conference, the secretary-treasurer of the conference, 




Church Choir of Minneapoli 
Minnesou 1936. 



the colored evangelist of the conference, and two Negro members 
to be elected. (2) We recommend that in conferences receiving ap- 
propriations for their colored work the proportionate share of local 
conference administration expense be on a ratio of one third to the 
colored and two thirds to the white work, this calculation to be 
based on practically equal constituency of white and colored mem- 
bership, and where the proportion of constituency varies from that 
of equality, either up or down, the proportion of administrative ex- 
pense be carried on the same ratio, up or down." 

The first black person elected to the General Conference was El- 
der W.H. Green, and he served from 1918 until his rather sudden 
death in 1928. In 1929, G.E. Peters, one of the most outstanding 
black pioneers of this church and one of the most progressive lead- 
ers that we have ever had, was elected to the office. In 1930, under 
his leadership, the following recommendations were made at the 
time of the General Conference Session, June 12, 1930, in San 
Francisco: (1) That the General Conference Committee select one 
of our representative colored ministers to fill the office of secretary 
of the Negro Department, that this secretary be located in Wash- 
ington, having his headquarters at the General Conference office; 
that in giving general supervision to the colored work throughout 
North America he'd work under the counsel of the General Con- 



ference Committee as do all other General Conference departmen- 
tal secretaries. Then, again, there was the reiteration of actions that 
had been previously taken concerning the organization of the col- 
ored work in the Southland and the recommendation^ for the 
Northern sections of our countp, . 

In regards to the organization of the earl\ work in the Southland. 
the committees that were referred to as the "colored" committees 
were more or less "rubber stamp" committees. For example, when 
I was an evangelist and a representative of the colored work in the 
Florida Conference, we would meet on the same day as the Execu- 
tive Committee; that was the committee made up of all the white 
representatives of the conference. They would meet generally 
speaking, in the morning and would make their decisions. These 
decisions not only pertained to the operation of the white work, but 
also the operation of the black work. Then, in the afternoon, the 
a)lored committee would meet. We would consider the recommen- 
dations that were made by the E\ecuti\e Committee, and uith ven. 
few exceptions, we would appro\e the dccision> ih.it were made 
prior to our meeting. 

You will recall that in the recommendation that was made at the 
General Conference Session in Francisco, it \sas requested that the 
General Conference Committee select one of our rcpreseniali\es to 




fill the office of secretary of the department. The reason for this ac- 
tion was due to the fact that Elder Peters only served one year. A 
crisis had arisen particularly in the East because one of our great 
leaders, J.K. Humphrey, had left the mainstream of Adventist and 
hundreds of black Adventists joined him in the organization of a 
Black conference. Elder Peters resigned from his office in the Gen- 
ral Conference, went to New York, and under the influence of his 
powerful, spirit-filled preaching was able to reclaim many of these 
members. At this time Elder F.L. Peterson, who later became a vice 
president of the General Conference, was elected to succeed Elder 
Peters. 

Notice that the statement also said that the secretary be located 
in Washington, D.C. having his headquarters in the General Con- 
ference office. 1 stated earlier that when Elder Green was elected in 
1918, he should not have his office in the General Conference, and 
this time the brethren were requesting that the Negro Department 
head have his office at the General Conference rather than having 
it in his home. There was strong resistance to a black man even in 
1929 and 1930 having his office at our headquarters in Washing- 
ton, DC. 

We now come to the Autumn Council of 1941, and at this coun- 
cil Elder G.E. Peters, who was again serving as the departmental 



secretary, gives his report. I would like to quote from his historic 
report: 

"Brother Chairman, I believe that we are all convinced that the 
Negro Department through the years has made wonderful ad- 
vancement and achievement. Just think, we have grown from 900 
believers in 1909 to 14,537 at the close of 1940. In the year 1912, 
the tithe receipts were $16,323 from the colored constituency, and 
during the last five years, or from 1936-1940 inclusive, our colored 
believers paid in tithe $1,1 12,000. During the same period, mission 
offerings were $703,000 as compared with $3,000 in the year 1912. 
Surely when taking all things into consideration, the colored Sev- 
enth-day Adventist is more of an asset than a liability." 

Elder Peters continues, "Relative to our present organization, it 
has been proven that in many instances in foreign fields it paid in 
large dividends when greater responsibility was placed on native 
workers. That role holds true when it comes to the Negro work in 
North America. It is obvious that the colored work made decided 
advancement when greater and larger duties were placed on their 
own leaders. 

It is particularly interesting to note the progress of our book 
work in certain Union territories where responsibility of leadership 
has been placed upon colored men. I believe that more will be ac- 




complished as we broaden the scope of organization for the Negro 
work." 

And, then, he referred back to 1929 to certain events that oc- 
curred. "It will be remembered that some years ago our colored 
brethren gave study to its work and its development as associated 
with this great movement, and the question of Negro Conferences 
was introduced. You see, that was back in 1929. As I mentioned 
earlier, CM. Kinney had raised the issue in 1889. The idea was 
that these conferences would operate under the guidance of the 
Union General Conference as do all other local conferences. It was 
reasoned by the colored brethren that just as prosperity attended 
the work when Negro churches were established, with Negro lead- 
ership in both the North and South for the furtherance of their own 
work, and such a development brought added souls and means to 
the cause of God, such a forward step with greater responsibility by 
Negro leaders who are versed with their own native psychology 
and means for the advancement of the cause of God and finishing 
of the work. 

This move was not considered wise at that time, so there was 
then offered what was considered a most desirable substitute plan 
of organization by a committee of both black and white. This orga- 
nization framed by the Plans Committee was adopted and became 



a resolution of the General Contcrcncc He then referred to the ac- 
tions of the Autumn Council ol the General Conference Com- 
mittee of 1929 in Columbus, Ohio, uhich concerned itself with the 
organization in the Southern Lnion lc\cN, the.se ad\isor\ com- 
mittees, and the appointment of a leading Black nunisier as a sec- 
retary or an evangelist and the same relationship m the Northern 
areas with the exception that the man vunild scr\e on the Union 
level as a member of the H\ecuu\e Committee, and on the local 
level as a member of the local conference commutee. 

Elder Peters further stated, "Brother Chairman, the plan u hich 1 
referred to has been carried out in lull in certain I nion Conler- 
ences, but carried out onl\ m part in other L mon ierriior\. The 
Union Conferences that are now opcraiiiii; the plan, that are not 
fully carrying out their resolution. 1 am sure base not held back 
willfully or from anv lack ol' interest in the colored \vork. Some- 
times in changing leaders the new leaders, m taking up the respon- 
sibility may not have had an opportunit\ to learn about said reso- 
lutions, its background, and its merit- '" 

"Our colored brethren ha\e waited lor \ears tor the lulllUing of 
this plan in total. Workers and lait\ .ire both asking whs has this 
vote of the General Conference not been tulh carried out. Thiriy 
one years ha\e passed since the department wa- tlrsl organi/ed 




with the employment of a full-time general secretary. As has been 
already stated, we numbered then only 900, but someone had a vi- 
sion and the vision brought results. We now number 15,000 and 
the advancement merits a full-time secretary in each Union Con- 
ference to spend his entire time in the duties outlined by the Au- 
tumn Council of 1929." 

Elder Peter continued, "My plea for the perfecting and strength- 
ening of the department, I would also suggest that the negro Advi- 
sory Committee be called together in 1942 and every two years 
thereafter. Sufficient time should be given to discuss plans and rec- 
ommendations for the development of the colored work with its 
own pecuUar problems. Personally, I believe the present organiza- 
tion known as the Negro Department can be made a more ideal 
system or organization for the Negro work of North America, if 
fully carried out and broadened. It is in harmony with the Spirit of 
Prophecy; and in every conference where it is put into full opera- 
tion, there will be greater and larger returns to the cause of God. 
As it is, we are doing well, but we can do better. To put this organi- 
zation full force where it is not now operating, will of course call for 
expenditures of a few more dollars, but even from a business view- 
point, we must spend money to make money. It must not be that 



children of this world are the only generation wiser than the chil- 
dren of Ught. 

"In closing. Brother Chairman, I ask for a continued confidence 
in the consecrated abihty of Negro leaders. Give us a fair chance, a 
greater responsibility with our own people, and I assure you there 
will be yet greater results in the building up of the work of God as 
related to the great Advent Movement where all races should stand 
together, united and true for the completing of the task committed 
to us by our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ." 

Let me refer to three significant statements that Elder Peters 
made in his report: (1) His appeal for confidence in the consecrated 
ability of Negro leaders. (2) His appeal for a fair chance of greater 
responsibility with our own people. (3) There will be greater results 
in the building up of the work of God as related to the great Ad- 
vent movement. 

I wonder what would have been the state of affairs today in our 
church as related to the development of our work among the blacks 
in the area of leadership and participation if the actions taken had 
been implemented. Recommendations are not worth the paper 
they are printed on unless they are carried out. For example, in 
1929, the same appeal Elder Peters made in 1941 was made by our 



Church school group; IJctroit, Michigan 1957. 




black leaders. But the church turned a deaf ear, and at that time, 
several of our leading black pastors left the orgnized church. J.K. 
Humphrey organized the first black conference; churches were es- 
tablished in America and in the West Indies. And there were other 
conditions existing in the church organization which placed the 
black believer and the black pastor in a position of inferiority. Now 
here are some examples which I think are very important to an un- 
derstanding of the subject we are endeavoring to present. 

I have already referred to the operation of the committees, par- 
ticularly in the Southland, and how it was more or less a "rubber 
stamp" committee. Then secondly, there was inequality of wages 
and allowances. For example, a black minister in Atlanta with a 
church of 500, with 15-20 years of service, would have a salary less 
than that of a young white pastor with a church of one hundred 
members. I can recall that when 1 first went to the Southwestern 
Union as union evangelist, one of the first prerequisites I laid down 
was the fact of equality of salaries. That was in 1946. 

Thirdly, there were limited funds for church and school build- 
ings. Surprisingly, very few churches were built for black congrega- 
tions during the years prior to regional conferences. There were 
limited funds for evangelism and very little equipment of any kind. 



During this time, our black loaders were forced \o attend segrega- 
ted meetings held by the church; that is. annual councils. 

I remember an experience back in the early 30's of the .•\uiumn 
Council in Fort Worth, Texas, where our black leaders had lo u^e 
the service elevator; of course, many refused to do that, and the) 
were branded as agitators, etc. During those days Seventh-da\ .Ad- 
ventist blacks were not accepted in our hospitals and sanitanums. 
The sanitarium in Washington did not permit blacks to enter until 
1940. Prior to that, there was a vcfn traiiic experience where a 
woman who was very ill was refused admittance and died later on 
her way to Freedmen's Hospital. Blacks could not eat at the Re- 
view and Herald until the earU W5()'s. W hen Elders Peter and Pe- 
terson had their otTice in the General Conference, thev could not 
even have their meals at the cafeteria. It' uas in the 1960"s bet'ore 
the largest white Seventh-day .Adventist church in Detroit \\ould 
acx-ept its first black member. And, toda\ . a Black Se%enih-da\ .Ad- 
ventist is not welcomed in the white church in Mobile. .Alabama. 

So you can see how the trend of segregation wuhin the church 
continued, even though in the 50's manv other churches had 
opened their door, to sav nothing o\ the change of climate in the 
sp«.irts and in the other areas of societ\. Consequenth . on the eNe of 



Lake Region Conference-First teacher's institute, January 6-8, 1946, Chicago, Illinois. 




historic years 1944 and 1955, racial segregation was still the policy, 
though it was unwritten in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. And 
this condition led our church to its vital historic compromise that 
was the organization of regional conferences. 

When I think of the historic event, I am reminded of the words 
of Ellen G. White-"until the Lord shows us a better way." This 
phrase is lifted from the statement made by Sister White in Vol- 
ume 9, pp. 206, 207, written at the turn of the century. It says in 
essence that because of the tensions between the races, because of 
the rigors of Jim Crowism, white and black believers would be wise 
to build and operate separate facilities, and that this is to be done 
"until the Lord shows us a better way." It was for these very rea- 
sons that we made reference that Black Adventism was organized 
into separate local jurisdiction with black leaders. The meeting to 
organize conferences was in Chicago in 1944. I quote from the 
minutes of that historic meeting. 

Whereas the present development of our work among the col- 
ored people in North America had resulted under the signal bless- 
ings of God in the Establishment of some 233 churches with some 



17,000 members, and whereas it appears that a different plan of or- 
ganization for our colored membership would bring further great 
advance in soul-winning endeavor, therefore we recognized, that 
colored conferences sustain the same relation to their respective 
union conferences as to their white conferences. 

Some leaders who played key roles in the establishment of black 
conferences were G.E. Peters, J.H. Wagner, L.H. Bland, J.G. Da- 
sent, J.G. Thomas, H.W. Kibble, T.M. Rowe and W.W. Fordham. 

It took us one whole century— from 1844 to 1944— to reach a 
membership of 17,000 in the Black constituency. In the 30 years 
since the organization of conferences, we have rocketed from 
17,000 to 100,000. 

In 1929, at the Autumn Council Session in Columbus, Ohio, El- 
der Peters made the appeal which I referred to earlier, "Give us a 
fair chance and I assure you there will be yet greater results in the 
building up of the work of God as related to the great Advent 
Movement." 

We thank God that the chance was finally given to us in 1945 to 
demonstrate what God could do through consecrated black lead- 



Educational Institute Cleveland, Ohi 




ership. The record of progress speaks ever so eloquently for itself. 

Now the question is "What of the future?" Let us remember that 
black conferences were brought into existence because of social 
conditions within America and our church conditions which we 
hope will change. Their presence will be a reminder of weakness, 
not of principle, but of practice within our organization. And fur- 
ther, let it be known that black conferences were accepted by the 
black faithful and loyal constituency of this church because it was 
the most practical way of evangelizing the millions of black Ameri- 
cans. We cannot predict the future. The Lord may yet reveal to us a 
better way; however, for many of our black leaders that better way 
was regional conferences, and even today there is still the need for 
refinement of our organization in order to reach the millions, ap- 
proximately 25 million, in our cities. 

This thought was articulated in 1969 when the Commission on 
Black Unions met in Washington, D.C. and as a result of that 
meeting the church leadership sensed its failure to provide lead- 
ership opportunities on higher levels; I am referring to Union Con- 
ferences. Consequently, today, on most of our union levels you will 



find black officers. The question of how best our church can meet 
the need of its black constituents and perspective black converts in 
the face of the growing racial unrest in our cities is a perplexing 
one. For example, the unparalleled growth and influences of the 
Black Muslims in our cities is a real challenge to the preachins of 
the Third Angel's Message b\ the black Se\enth-dav .AdventiNt 
Church. Therefore, we need your pravers and sup[x>rt. tor the 
black Seventh-day Adventist Church is the only remaining \Mtness 
to Adventism in our cities, for as \ou know, most of our churches 
have fled to the suburbs. 

Therefore, for the present and the t'oreseeable future, we believe 
that regional conferences have come upon the stage of action "for 
such a lime as this", and its goal under God is to finish the \vork 
and to hasten the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

\\ .W. Fordham. Director 
Regional Department 




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"Acquaint now thyself with Him and 
be at peace." 

Job, thousands of years ago, gave to 
mankind the answer to the calamity, 
furor, and unhappiness that exists 
within our breasts. 

While Oakwood is based on reli- 
gious principles and its foundation is 
built in the word of God, it profits us 
nothing unless these same traits are in 
our lives. Therefore, we must work at 
having a religion that possesses us, 
rather than possessing a rehgion. 



Elder Ward, our spiritual leader, holds tightly the rule of faith. 



On Sabbath we're seen in great numbers. 





-¥1 



11 



%.-.«' 





Dr. Eva B. Dykes 1st black woman in America to receive the Ph.D. 



Frtrsidcni of ihc college, Dr Calvin 
Rfxk Ijghis ihc wa\ 





1976 



Oakwood's beginning may be traced to 1895, 
when the General Conference Association sent a 
three-man educational committee authorized to 
spend $8,000 to select a site in the South for a 
school for Negro youth. These were G.A. Irwin, 
who as director of the Southern District of the 
General Conference had developed a special in- 
terest in the Negroes; O.A. Olsen, president of the 
General Conference and H. Lindsay, who had as- 
sisted in the founding of Battle Creek College. 

On the way southward they stopped at the 
home of L. Dyo Chambers in Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee (where they met Anna Knight, one whose 
name was later connected with the education of 
Negroes in the South for more than a half cen- 
tury), and then went on to Alabama. In Hunts- 
ville, where the population was then about 15,000 
they learned of a 360-acre farm, about five miles 
northwest of the town, which they inspected. After 
the committee made its report, Olsen and Irwin 
returned to Huntsville to negotiate for the land. 
With them was M.E. Olsen, son of O.A. Olsen. 

As the committee began looking over the land, 
Irwin said that he felt deeply impressed that this 
was the very place they were looking for, and the 
others concurred. As Irwin and Olsen walked un- 
der the 65 towering oaks that stood on what was to 
become the heart of the campus, they decided that 
the place should be called Oakwood. 

In striking contrast to the symmetrical appear- 
ance of the giant oaks were the mass of brush and 
briers and low-hanging hmbs a few- yards to the 
south; the dilapidated manor house and west of it 



the well choked with debris, the old leaning barn 
and the row of nine cabins, all falling apart— four 
ordinary log cabins and five built of squared cedar 
logs planted upright in the ground and clap- 
boarded. 

Among those who began clearing the land after 
it was purchased by the General Conference was 
George W. Warsaw, who was born on the land 
when it was known as Irwin's farm, and who oper- 
ated a small nursery almost to the time of his 
death in 1957. In a personal interview he de- 
scribed the old cotton gin and the nine cabins. 

Before the arrival of the first principal. Colon 
M. Jacobs of Iowa, in April, 1896, J.J. Mitchell of 
California and Grant Adkins of Atlanta were in 
charge of the property, and two students (George 
Graham of Birmington and Grant Royston of 
Vicksburg) were on the grounds. The men who 
composed the school board, in addition to Jacobs 
were O.A. Olsen and G.A. Irwin, both of whom 
came and in their overalls worked to prepare the 
site. Jacobs added to the Old Mansion a room 18 
by 44 feet, to be used as the kitchen and dining 
hall. In November, a new two-story building was 
ready, the first floor used for classrooms and the 
second floor, as a boy's dormitory. 

Oakwood Industrial School. With four buildings 
and a property valued at $10,157, with four teach- 
ers, and fewer than 24 students Oakwood Indus- 
trial School opened its doors on November 16, 
1896. The faculty consisted of H.S. Shaw, A.F. 
Hughes, Hattie Andre and the principal. 








This photograph was taken in 1905 of one of nine slave cabins that still stood on the old Iruin plantation when it 
was purchased in 1895. 








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Oakw(;<jd ((jllegc is the outgrowth of ihe Oak- 
wo(xl Industrial Schocjl, f<junded 1896 b\ the Gen- 
eral Qjnfercnce of Seventh-day Adventists. After a 
number of years of successful operation the name 
was changed to Oakw(x;d Manual Training Schocjl. 
n 1917, two years of college work were offered, and 
the school was known as OakwcKjd Junior College, In 
the spring of 1943, ancjther forward step was taken 
by the institution when it was advanced to the status 
of a senior ujllege. Since that time it has been known 
a.s Oakwood College. 

The institution is owned and operated b\ the Cjen- 
eral Conference of S.D.A. as a cc^llege h^r Christian 
higher education. 

Oakwood College is accredited b\ the Southern 
As.s(x;iation of Colleges and Schools and is approved 
by the Seventh-day Advenlist Bnard wt RcHcnls 




Oakwood builds its offerings around the philos- 
ophy that "true education is more than the pur- 
sual of a certain course of study. It means more 
than the preparation for the Ufe that now is. It is 
the harmonious development of the physical, the 
mental, and the spiritual powers. It prepares the 
student for the joy of service in this world, and for 
the higher joy of wider service in the world to 
come." 

-Education, p. 13. 

In harmony with this philosophy of education, 
the administration and faculty of Oakwood Col- 
lege have defined its objectives as follows: 

The purpose of the spiritual and religious in- 
struction at Oakwood College is to reflect fully the 
image of Jesus Christ through emphasis on the de- 
velopment of character and talent, the nobility of 
ambition, the keenness of perception with sound 
judgement; so that the student is prepared to ren- 
der unselfish service to God and man. 




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Consonant with the diMnc plan of edu- 
cation, the College purpo>c> to develop in 
its students certain atuuidcN and abilities 
that are conducive lo indcpendeni and 
cTeative thinking; lo turihcr acquaint 
facts and principles of the niaior fields of 
knowledge, together with a more in- 
tensive concentration in one or more of 
these fields. Oakwood seeks to help the 
student to develop proficnc\ in the use of 
the English language, to encourage an un- 
biased altitude on controversial issues, 
and to nioti\ate wnhui the student a per- 
sistent and continuing intellectual 
curiosit\ . 




As an integral part of the total development of the stu- 
dent, the College endeavors to develop in its youth desir- 
able personalities, refined taste, and correct usage of the 
social graces which will prepare them for participation in 
social and recreational activities, and to understand and 
respect persons of varied backgrounds and experiences. 

The College seeks to help the student understand him- 
self, to the end that he may make the maximum use of 
whatever powers he has, both for his own and for the so- 
cial good. While the student must learn the subjects that 
are offered in curriculum, he must also find out about him- 
self and how he may best fit into the social order. 

The physical education program of the College attempts 
to give an intelligent understanding of the standards which 
govern the function and care of the body. It seeks also to 
establish in the student a consistency in the observance of 
habits and practices that engender maximum physical vi- 
tality and health. Emphasis is placed on the proper use of 
leisure time, either of some activity worthy of physical de- 
velopment in some gymnastic enterprise given under 
supervision. 




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Oakwood College endea\orN lo leach its 
students the dignit) ot" labor, to train them in 
practical work which uill enable them to 
cope with lite Mtuations, to impart Nkill and 
knowledge in certain \ocation> best >uited to 
the student's interest> and aptitudes, and to 
offer professional and preprofesMonal 
courses which will aid the students in their 
choice of a \ocaiion. 



A VISION OF HIM 



I have climbed a hill at the break of day 
And have turned my face to the sun; 

And watched in the sky as its glory spread 
At the start of its daily run. 

I have stood beneath a dripping oak 

As the sky gave forth its dew; 
And watched as the grass drank in the rain 

And the earth and the oak did too. 

I have stood alone on a windswept plain 
And have seen the earth meet sky; 

And watched as the two, each in its own way, 
To the other seemed to die. 

I have stood at dark when stars were lit 
And the heavens blossomed bright; 

And watched as the birds all hid their heads 
From the whispers of the night. 

But whether I face the sun at dawn. 
Or the plain, or the stars at night, 

I know that God, the Maker of all. 
Is the one that gives the sight. 

And I dare not let a day go by 

Without a vision of Him. 
For what profit a man, if he sees the world 

And the sight of His Maker is dim. 

Walter T. Rea 



Through Fourscore Years 




During its 80 years (the biblical fourscore that sug- 
gests strength) Oakwood has seen much and been in- 
volved in much. The changes from reconstruction south 
to the era of the mushrooming repressive jim-crow leg- 
islation. The painful, almost glacial climb of Black 
America up to judicial/ litigation ladder. The age of 
confrontation when the wall of de Jure segregation, Jeri- 
cho-like, came down. Oakwood has not existed in a 
vacuum. 

During these fourscore years the work among the 
Black American has been bound up with Oakwood. No 
other institution in Adventism has taken upon itself or 
had thrust upon it such singular responsibility. In fact, 
there was very httle work among America's largest mi- 
nority before Oakwood. The founding of Oakwood was 
the watershed event, or to change the figure, Oakwood 
has been matrix and spawning ground of men and 
ideas. 

Oakwood has also been witness to and, involved in 
the development and maturation of the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church. Its coming of age, exercising its pecu- 
liar function as eyes, ears, barometer of the times and 
window to the world, Oakwood has been a blessing. 
What other institution has had such a positive influence 
on the psychological and social orientation of the parent 
organization? 

During the insuing years, Oakwood has become the 
institutionalized spirit of a people who felt at home in 
its shadows. Oakwood has been chief molder of Afro- 



American Adventism-its elhos. its central core. The 
two are inseparable. 

In times of racial ferment and change. Oakwood's 
children like sons of Issachare wise mterpreiers of the 
times, gave faithful council and guidance. Each forw ard 
move taken after careful examination of this issue, 
brought strength to the work. It was so in 1909 (organi- 
zation of the General Conference Negro Department). 
1919 (when the first black was appointed secretary of 
the department) and 1930 (when regional conferences 
were organized as "a better way" to prosecute the work 
among America's largest minority). These were periods 
of intense unrest and afitation. when the plight of black 
Americans was brought dramatically to the attention of 
the general public. .And while the world does not set the 
church's agenas. the church is challenged to examine its 
agendas in the light of what is happening m the world. 

During the ensuing years, Oakwood has become the 
institutionalized spirit. 

On the eve of .America's third cenlur\. Oakwtx->d cele- 
brates her own past; eight decades of history rich with 
varied experiences, sunlight and shadow, mountain top 
and valley. But the past is prologue. The kingdom of 
God will not remain on the drawing board of prophecs. 
so Oakwood's faithful sons and daughters have been 
taught to believe. Thev rise up to face that glorious dav 
and to hasten its advent by greater dedication and com- 
mittment to Christ's global mission. 

C.E. Bradford 



• 


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HAPPENINGS 



■■^ 



Registration The Beginning and The Beginning of 
an End. A Profile in Pictures 





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In iy/:)f; Sixteen sludenii reg;-acrcd lo 
j-'o to I he Humsville School". 80 
vears later after more than six thou- 
sand Alumni, over one thousand stu- 
dents were registered fall quarter 1976. 

Just like so many years ago they 
came with anticipation, not knowing 
exactiv v-hat t(^ expect or what they 
might find, f here were no long lines in 
1896, there were no exorbitant tuition 
ees. Registration was not a all day af- 
tair. registration wasn't a reunion of 
(j|d classes, registration was not a fash- 
Kjn shov. There was no need for a ma- 
jor adviscjr because the curriculum uas 
excessive]) limited We ha\e come a 
long vva). 




Freshman Orientation Finale 




This story begins with a trip and ends with a 

ndle light ceremony. On a distant shore of an 

island far into the sea; in a small village in the 

country of Ethiopia; on the western beaches of the 



the people infested urban inner city of N.Y., Chi- 
cago, Los Angeles; yes even Atlanta and Phila- 



Inl8S. . 
1950'swas 
jet age has 



ral community that might exist anywhe 


re in an 


country. A mother can be seen giving la 


St minut 


instructions like "don't forget to study 


your sab 


bath school lesson", "here is a tooth brus 


h. be sur 



to buy some tooth paste. 



warm atmosphere of home and family. Others 
with the happy thought of escaping family conflict 
and maturing pains embark upon an adventurous 
escape. Upon arriving the recurring thoughts be- 
gin-"will I be academically successful", "will they 
like me," "what will I major in," "Oh! I wish I was 
back with my family." 




The family waves as the car speeds away, old friends give you 
a kiss and a hug. Everybody promises to write. Some students 
travel as far as 7,000 or more miles to make this date with des- 
tiny. No matter how they travel, like all freshmen they live in 
uneasy expectation. The first objective, find a room and a room- 
mate, and if one arrived early he has the opportunity to carry his 
luggage and maybe even his parents first to this room, and then 
another, upstairs and downstairs, checking the view, question- 
ing: is it close enough to the bathroom? will it be big enough? 
how much closet space? Do I hke the curtains? is the furniture 
new? 

Axe the mattresses soft? But of course this opportunity is only 
afforded those few who arrive early. For others, it is just a mat- 
ter of being assigned a room by the resident Dean. 




Bookin' 




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Organist Hemdon Spillman 




The Genius 



The date is Sunday, Oct. 12, 1975. The place, 
' .hby Auditorium. A new and steady shinning 

;ht radiated from the man of genius, Herndon 
„pillman. An introduction is made and after- 
ward the Oakwood College audience awaits 
with anticipation the performance of this re- 
nown artist. After completing the explanation 
of his program format, he cooly, expertly slides 
onto the bench which sits in front of the Rodger 
concert touring organ. As the music fills the au- 
ditorium there is no doubt of the talent of this 
man. 

A native of Alabama, Herndon Spillman is a 
frequent recitalist throughout the U.S. He has 
performed on numerous campuses and for 
many American Guide of Organists chapters. 
He is engaging and articulate in concert, eager 
and able to communicate to his audiences and 
to lead them in to the awesome and beautiful 
music he so masterfully performs. 

At the conclusion of the Lyceum program, 
Oakwood College had witnessed that awesome 
and beautiful music and rewarded Spillman 
with a heartfelt standing ovation. A reward for 
a job well done. 




Frances Walker Pianist 





The lights went out over the audience. The dim stage lights sil- 
houeted a grand piano. If that was not enough, there was not a 
hundred and fifty people present in a 600 seat auditorium in atten- 
dance at the beginning of the program. 

Although lights were dim and the crowd uas Miiall, this did not 
subtract any of the extraordinar\ skill that triiK beloiibis to Frances 
Walker. 

Her biographical sketch testifies ot her outstanding academic 
achievements, which have earned her respect and admiration. 
Presently, she serves at Rutgers Uni\ersit\ and is Pianist-in-Resi- 
dence at Lincoln University. 

She has performed at Lincoln Center. Times Hall and recently at 
Washington National Galler\ of An. Her work has also been ac- 
claimed by discriminating audiences in Lngland. Gcrman\ and the 
Netherlands. 



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A&M Sympo 




It might be said that the United Student 
Movement at Oakwojd College evolved ver\ 
slowly, but once expan.sion commenced it blos- 
s<jmed rapidly. It was in the latter part of 
March 1976 on a warm sunny afternoon that 
Elder Walter W. Fordham, class of "34", in an 
mformal conversati(jn uncloaked a view of 
changes effected by a G(x] directed L'.S.M. It 
was between the years 1930-32 that the U.S.M. 
of O.C. initiated m(jst important changes in its 
function as a student organization. This event 
has burned an impression intfj the pages of His- 
tory that time cannot erase. The stop, has been 
expanded in the introducKjp. sectujn of the his- 
torical segment. 

In 1975-1976 L.S.M. began its preparation 
shortly after elections the year before. The 
Dean of Students, Claude Thomas gave major 
assistance to the newly elected officers enabling 
them to increase their leadership abilities and 
more effectively to handle their responsibility 
to the student body. He conducted workshops 
for the U.S.M. officers on varied subjects di- 
rected toward group facilitation, leadership. 
and crisis intervention. 





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Clifton Jessup spent a considerable amount of the 
summer time involved in the active operations of the 
U.S.M. So did Wilbur Young, Yearbook editor, Joseph 
Okike, treasurer, and Colleen Boyd, Asst. Secretary. A 
considerable amount of time was spent on job training 
and pre planning so that students would have a more 
effective functioning U.S.M. 

In preparation for the U.S.M. emphasis week it was 
pointed out by the President, George Valentine that we 
needed a slogan that would exemphfy the character of 
this year's U.S.M. As a result of this thurst "The Door Is 
Open" was selected from an advertisement found in one 
of the major black career journals by Vice President 
CUfton Jessup. 



^ 4 





The back drop was prepared b\ Gransille 
Jones, public relations consultant, of the L .S.M, 
International Student Organization (ISO), under 
the direction of Farrel Jones, executed the parade 
of flags representing more than 21 countries that 
make up our student body. Alma Blackmon's 
choir sang Great God Almighty and Hulk Him L'p 
for the Freshman class and new students. This was 
the first opportunity for them to hear the .\eloians 
on home turf It was the fear of the President of 
U.S.M. that anything after the choirs perfor- 
mance, would be anticlimatic. He ua.N right. W in- 
ton Ford, Dean of Men administered the oath of 
ofllce to George N'alentine, President of I S.M.. 
Dean Dorthv Hollowav. Dean of women, admin- 
istered the oath of otTice to Clifton Jessup. general 
Vice President of L'.S.M. Winton Forde also ad- 
ministered the oath of office in the absence of 
Claude Thomas. Dean of Students, to the remain- 
ing otTicers of L'.S.M. .A brass ensembled directed 
by Stanley Ware, instructor in music, made their 
debut. 




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The Changing Of The Guard 




II IS 1963, Oakwood has been a (ully accrediicd senior 
a)llege since 1959. G.J. Millet has been president for 
nine years. The a^llege faculty and administration, as 
well as the campus have developed rapidly; the number 
of administrau^rs and faculty has increased. So have the 
course offerings. Many (jf the older buildings have been 
renovated, in addition to a new physical education facil- 
ity, an up to date men's dormitory, a contemp^jrary 
science complex, and an ultra modern library and labo- 
ratory school. With these accomplishments President 
Millet steps out of leadership at Oakwcxjd to assume 
other important duties. Time moves quickly on to 1975. 
and President Rock is granted leave to enhance his aca- 
demic qualifications. Once again Dr. G.T. .Millet is des- 
ignated as the man to serve as president in the interim. 



»^ M^ »"»*. 1 -iTi 



Story Hour 




"Suffer little children to come unto me for of 
such is the kingdom of heaven " 

Storyhour is conducted by a group of Oak- 
wood Students who really believe in this pas- 
sage, as a part of the outreach program. God's 
love and sacrifice is taught to them through the 
medium that every little child enjoys the most; 
storytelling. 







It is the aim o\' the stor\ hour band to impress 
upon the minds oi" these children how wonderful 
their Savior is and how much he loves and cares 
tor them. It also encourages the child to see God 
as his hero. He is better than Nuperman or captain 
kid or even shazam and a lot ot' other ficticious 
heros who fade aua\ uiih tune. The\ are laushi 
that God is theirs lor ioda\. tomorrow and 
forever. 

The stor\ hour band also believes in the passage 
of scripture that sa\s "and a little child shall lead 
them." How wonderful it uould be if the seed 
planted in the minds of these children grew to 
natuniN. and flowered out to capture their par- 
ents, fanuh and 



/ 



OMEGA SIGMA PSI 




When else can someone show his personal magnitude of fool- 
ishness except during the Omega Sigma Psi Initiation? Prospec- 
tive members, males and females, kooks and clowns, join to- 
gether in the parade of Shenanigans to outshine the other in 
sport, in jest, and plain old fun. When the bell chimes its last 
note on jocularity of the behavioral science organization and the 
last caper has been pulled, the newly elected members join the 
others atop Monte Sano. They retreat to an atmosphere of song, 
laughter, and love in the natural setting of God's handiwork. 
They recapture the spirit of unity in God in whom they live, and 
move, and have their being. 




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Many students had long-range plans of going home 
or to some friends hideaway for the quarter break like 
good old R and R (Rest and Recuperation). Some dear 
souls, for whatever the reason, took their break right 
here at the Oaks; sleeping all day. visiting fish ponds in 
the community, or maybe working, trying to make a few 
bucks with which to get back in school the next quarter. 

It just so happened that the 1975 school year's year- 
book, though drastically late, arrived on campus during 
this holiday. The question arose at the Executive 
U.S.M. meeting-How will we distribute the '75 
yearbook? 



1 




Spring Break 





Consequently, it was decided s>.c"d hj\c searbook Mt:- 
ning parly in the cafeteria- Arthur Huniphre) was our 
projectionist. We laughingly regressed through Roadrun- 
ner and the Three Stooges that was followed b\ a jo\ous 
frolic of fun and games. The faces of these people express 
a happy release of tension. Loneliness, disgust, smiles, 
laughter, contact, nobodv knows me, and man\ more ex- 
pressions tell us e.\actl\ how n was 



WEEK-END 



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While. WUIis. and coopwood trying to relocate the good oU dayi. 



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can often cloud our monumenb to the past. 






Daughter and Molher-Don't they look good? 




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guest choiis for Alumni Weekend. 



Aeolians go to Dayton. 



On April 30, 1976, 70 young people, 3 chaperones, and Ms. Blackmon boarded 1 
bus and 3 vans. Their destination was Dayton, Ohio to sing for Allegheney Confer- 
ence-Youth Congress. They would sing for divine worship and a sacred concert 
that Sabbath evening. 

"It was drizzling when we left Huntsville, but when we arrived in Dayton, the sun 
was shining bright. We had a few mishaps with one bus losing its way, but because 
we were in God's care we made it there safely. 

For Divine Worship we sang, "Let All the Nations", "In His Care-o", and "Light 
Divine". For the evening concert the first half consisted of Randall Thompson's 
"Peacable Kingdom"; during intermission Michele Cleveland rendered two selec- 
tions: "In the Lord", and "All the World is Mine". The second half of the concert 
was music by James Weldon Johnson. Thank you for your kindness and fellowship, 
and for making it an enjoyable Spirit-filled weekend. 









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STUDENT 
LIFE 





Ladies and gentlemen, the President and Vice-President of the U.S.M. 



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Some people ju-sl can'l handle being photographed. 





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It must be 3:30 




We passed Barham's final! 



But Ted, I don't want your kiss 



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Why Delores I didn't know I didn't know you could be so quiet. 





don't turn your face from mc like . . . Green if you won"i I will 





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Confucius say, "When hungry— eat." ■'.'*■' * ;«7 




Ha, ha, ha, tee, hee hee. 




Wi^ndc-r what ihjs stuff ta.stes like 




Are you kidding? 



I guess after we finish here, I'll go get some sleep 




Who me? 




Look Ma! No cavities! 





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You can join us, but it's gonna cost you some money 





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If I had a hammer, I'd try to play it. 

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StjmchKxJy's takmy mv picture 




If you people want punch, bring your cups, please 



This is delightfully refreshing 



Munch a bunch 




Go on, go on, go on, go on, go on, g( 




I wonder who else is 



coming 






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SPORTS 



Dead eye Walter spots his man, but can he get the ball to him 




Flagball 




Look at O.J. Tony, he's really handling that ball. 





Hey buddy, li ihal as far as you can 



Champion Flagball Team 



Michael Morgan, led his team to an 8-1 record. 




Basketball 




Smith, this is not gymnastics, it's basketball 



Jujrip hall Oo' Jump ball, Oo! Jump 




Harris from L.A. Rams is at it again 





Wilbur on his way to beat somebody in Tennis! 



Tennis 



Jack Doggette almost didn't make it 
over this alumnist of Oakwood 
College! 



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Take carclul aim and hil thai round tinny in the air iku''H« 



Very good swing Dcbra, but next time hit the ball!! 




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Do you know who these legs belong to? 




". . . and I dare you to hit just one my wav 



Greg swings with all of his might 




Look at that form of 
Jerry Foster. Too bad 
the batter put the ball in 
O.C. Park. 



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Soccer 



That's right, keep it going. 




It finally makes the air. 



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Paul and Johnn) seem lo be 
racmg wiih the baJJ. 



^ *».-V jsv* iiiL. . _iO s 



Who said there was nt) fun in Soccer. 



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sports Spectacular 



You're really truckin' there, Miranda 



Crisp, cool air, tingling against the skin, streams of 
sweaty beads racing from the neck and armpits, a 
normal face twisted and pressed like clay, by a per- 
sistant thought into a fixture of frenzy. This is but a 
glimpse of an athlete in action. Whatever your game 
is determine to be more than a vicarious participator. 
Dig into the subsequent sports pages and find more 
than entertainment. Find the personahty of "ruff and 
tuff athletes giving it all they've got. 




Sam is the first human hydroplane 




Pi 



Some days I just don't feel like doing anything 




Hey! Come back here the start gun hasn't sounded yet. 











V IggliLj" 



^ 

1 



Our ladies at O.C. are ver^ aih- 
leiic as you can sec. 








fit} 
















ill 








Hey look Daryl, would you move over some. 





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Henry hands the baton to Keith and he takes off like a jet. 



Now for the BIG foot race with Allan, Donald and Edward, 




Now gentlemen no fighting, or 
hugging, or kissing, well just stand 
in the line right! 




Oh Steve, may I have your autograph too? 



•;. 



i 





5 ii ...-.Ji-.:-?!?^ 



Tcm. put Nour tongue back inio 



a tow spectators dissectmi a t'ellow spectator! 





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I 





£M 



1 wonder who these two are racing against 




Well, here they are on their way 








^"m M- 




But she ended up with Ted tor the rac 



V. 




A black hawk coming in for a landing 





Kolowa, frozen by a Canon F-1 at 2,000/1 sec. F-8 




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I got a chicken in my blood 





Terri Barron blows by 





Smoke on down, Omerror D.i 



Mich.K-1, did vou stop tho \v.Uv.-h tn iimo! 



165 



A slugger at bat. 



Say, you're going the wrong way! 




^ 



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We can't believe our eyes. 




not iirnc Ui feed the thickens vei. 






Hank I'm running this next race just for you 



Arthur knows the race is not to the swift but to those who endure 



^'*M i K 



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Tell me, where is my competition? 




Toyia turns on the steam while Terri starts the Barron burning 



could do this all da 




Dean is geltinti old I'hc juico is sUnvini; down 



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CLASSES 



iHi 




Allen. Glenn 
Anderson. Kenneth 
Anderson. Paul 
Andre. Karen 
Andre^^^. .Arthur L 
.Andrews. Bobb\ L. 
An\aionwv. Gco(rre> 
Ates. Phillip 
Baker. Stephanie 
Balmir. FranteMTa 
Barher. Drake 



Barron. J»r>cph 
Barron. Tcre 
Batcv Ira 
Beak. Bernard 
Bcllhommc. Danielle 
Bernard. Stephanie 
Berrien. Claude 
BcNi. Edward 
Bethel. Andrea 
Blackwell. RusmtII 
Bla\lock. Deborah 



Bradle\. Jv>annc 
Bradlev Mars 
Branilev. Ruth 
Bra\e. Jermile 
Briahi. Alberta 
Bnmaae. Jolene 
Brition. Pamela 
BriH^ks. Jill 
Brown. Edna 
Brown. Dava 
Brown. Dawn 



Brown. Mano 
Br\ant. Benha 
Br^anl. Glenward 
Burkov. Roscmar^ 
BLim>. Patricia 
Bush. Larr> 
Bsrd. Pee^N 
Campbell. Earl 
Carsv>n. Jeannie 
Camncton. Bernard 
CarrolL Bett\ 



Carter. Edith 
Carter. Judith 
CartN* right. Constance 
Chandler. David 
Chavers. Lev^n 
Chinvere. Nwanpnga 
Chnsiian. Tonia 
Christian. Tomj 
Chnstopher. Bema«l«i(e 
Chnsiopher. Lie* ells t> 
Clawn. B^^bbi 




Clay, Mable 
Coke, F'auline 
Cook, Timothy 
Cooper, Sheldon 
Cooper, Steve 
Coopwood, Dawn 
Coopwood, Diane 



Cornish, Clinton 
Cotton, Sharon 
Covington, Chandra 
Cox, Michael 
Crawford, Debra 
Crider, Charles 
Cummings, Roy 



Dailey, Daphne 
Danley, Cassandra 
Darrell, Barbra 
Davis, Debra 
Dawes, Clifton 
Denson, Larry 
Diamond, Diana 






OCIf^ 



^ f 



•A • I 






1^. 



■^ 




Dickerst^n. Jo\ 
Doggcit, Jack 
DoLvm. Anons 
Douglas. PhiUip 
Downs, Gar^ 
Dunn. Em>na 
Essex. Barbara 
Essex. Ronald 
ENans. IsjJore 
E\ans. Mehnda 
E%eU. Oswald 



Fields. Ted 
Finch. NVilietic 
Fisher. Sandra 
Fvirdc. Jouce 
Faster. Darxl 
Fi>sier. Pcggk 
Freeman. Mora 
Fussed. Denise 
CiahneL Eluabcih 
GalUghcr. Cornell 
Galbgher. Gev^nee 




y 'J 



Gam berg. Ellen 
German). Grcgorv 
Gilford. Vera 
Gorcc. Dannv 
Graham. Barbra 
Graham. V'eola 
Gray. Wilma 
Greene. George 
Greene. Adora 
Gndcr. Joe 
Gncr. Ruchell 



Griffin. Vonzel 
Gnpper. Orlando 
Gnppcr. Orlaniha 
Gunn. 0>car 
Hamilton. Brcnda 
Hard>. MicheUe 
Hams. .Marcus 
Hams. Yvetia 
Harrison. Duane 
Hamson. Juds 
Harnion. S\lvia 



Ha\s. Linda 
Hendrix. An a 
Henr%. Cheryl 
Henry. Fcrliia 
Herbert. Ariene 
Hicks. Pauleii 
Higgins. Dana 
Hilts. Annette 
Hodges. Michael 
Holland. Nathaniel 
Holies. Dennis 



Hollis, Nathaniel 
Holmes, Glona 
Holms, Thalee 
Holt. Joyce 
Houston. Aldrensa 
Howard. George 
Hughes, William 
Hull. Janice 
Humphreys, James 
Hundley. Leonard 
Husband. George 



Hulies. EroecTs 
Ibie. Kasen 
IbsKilo. Chns 
Irby. Diana 
Jaci.s<^n. Lynn 
Jacobs, Cynthu 
Jdcv^bs. SinHM) 
JetTcrs<>n. Thomas 
JinLins. .\(yn>n 
Jessup, Cynihu 
Joh<*^n. Fa\ 





a«€>«^ 








Johns. Vivian 
iohnvm. Bobby 
Johnson. Encka 
Johnson. Loyd 
Johnson. Manon 
Johnson, langucrey 
Jones. Roniild 
Jones. Sharen 
Jones. Shirlene 
Jusuc. Jacob 
Kcnnjc. Cwendolvn 



King. Diannc 
Lane. Tcm 
Laurel. Deborah 
Lawrence. Joan 
Lee. Berr> 
Lee. Brenda 
Lee. Debra 



Lee. Theresa 
Leonard. Randal 
Lewix Diane 
Lewis. Mcrcredics 
Lewis, Rhonda 
Llosd. Nomne 
Logan. Robsn 



Lyics, Thomas 
Madison. Cunis 
Mathe\k>. Opheh; 
Mauein, LaVani 
Malone. Denise 
Johnson. Vanessa 
Jones. .Ms a 



Jones, Jvvinn 
Jones. Ssla 
Jones, PauU 
kin£. Earl 
Lee. Ldrrs 
Little. RKk\ 
Niaaxllc. Rv>sel\n 



^!!^t^ €^ O^ f% t^ 



#i 





McBridc. Son\a 
McCall. Linda 
McCovkan. Angela 
McDonald. Andrea 
Mccachranc. Jacinih 
MtEl/o). Ronald 
McGill. Donnic 
Mciniosh. Evenon 
Mcintosh. Phyllts 
.McKinnc>. Timoth\ 



McKnighL Pnnce 
McNeil. Alvin 
McNeil. Charles 
McNeil. John 
McNeil. Ruth 
McNuckles. Edwin 
Middlcion. Benjamin 
Middleton. Ben 
Miller. Lennox 
Mills. Theresa 
Mitchel. Ariene 



Miicheij. Bobbv 
Mitchell. Marlon 
Moment. Jacqueline 
Monford. Hudre\ 
Morales. Debra 
Moore. Joyce 
Moore. Leamon 
Moore. Wajne 
Moms. Felicia 
Mull. Cathy 
Munveve. James 



Murphy. \iMjn 
Nassy. Desiree 
Nlxoh. Jake 
Norman, Audrey 
Obodoekvke. Godfrey 
Odcm. James 
Odu. ChijKike 
Ogbum. .MK-hellc 
Olaniyan. Abiodun 
Olcodie. Sunday 
Onu. SundaN 



Paschal. Reginald 
Parks, ha 
Parham. Roy 
Palmer. Joe 
Pembertv'-n. Kim 
Perry. James 
Petenk^n. Rose 
Pitt, Betty 
PitLs, [X^reen 
Powdl. Debbie 
Preston. Larrv 




Price. Deborah 
ProvcHL Esther 
Provost. Millon 
Pugh. Juaniia 
Pugh. Kin£a 
Radnev. Cryvui 
Randlc. Jr.'0«ie 
Reid. Pauline 
Richards. Kenneth L 
Richardson. Gasie 
Richardson. Paul 



Riley. Carol 
Roberu. Dcnise 
Robins<jn. Jdl 
Robinson. .Marlscc 
Robinson. Salaihiel 
Rolle. Charles 
Rora. Cassandra 
Ross. .Marsha 
Ro*e. .Alfred 
Royal. Donna 
RugJess. Delores 



Rugless. George 
Rutledge. Regina 
Samatar. Ha»a .Ally 
Sampson. LuValle 
Sanders. Renee 
Sandr. Warren 
Seafood. Carolvn 



Sharpe. Shelia A. 
Shaser^. Pamela 
Shcrrod. Benito 
Sherron. Tern 
Simevin. Denise 
Simpkms. GregoPb 
Simpson. Chiia 



Sims, Joyce 
Slater. Chariesettj 
Slocumb. MkhjeJ 
Smith. Beseriy 
Smith. Bndn 
Smith. Melk^nie 
Smith. Ora L 



187 




'4 i '-ci 






^- 



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I 




[-} 



r^ 



ii 





f ^^f 




Smith, Rcgina 
Smith, S|iirlcy 
Snipes, William 
Spcncc. Jennifer 
Spinks, (Jennis 
St Bernard 
Stewart. Calvin 
Stenson, Sy 
Stringer, Willie 



Tapscott, Dorothy 
Tate, Fannie 
Taylor, Malcolm 
Thomas, Brian 
Thoma.s, Marian 
Thomas, Milton 
Thomas, Raymond 
Thompson, Cu 
Timmons, Glenn 



Timpson, Donna 
Tucker; Alene 
Tucker, Donnam 
Vaughn, Agnes 
Veland, Carla 
Walker, Ronald 
Wallace, Freda 
Warren, Victoria 
Washington, Carole 



Washington, Teresa 
Watkins, Harrison 
Wells. Lawrence 
Wharton, .Arthur 
White, Cynthia 
White, Maunce 
Wilhams, Bernard 
Wiliiiuns. Eric 
Williams. Harp. 



Williams, Pat 
Wilhams, Ruth 
\Nillianis. Tamara 
Willis. Cheryl 
Wilstm, C\nthia 
Wilson, Idella P 
Wils^m, Jesse Jr 
W mbome, S«.>n\a 
^ oung. Hadassah 
Zimmemian. Frankie 



1t» 



Sophomores 





Adams. Eloise 
Adams, Judith 
Alexander. Curtis 
Alexander. Mary 




Jrinson, Alveretta 

BroNMi. Hcnrv 

Blown, Mildred 

Brown, Ricardo 



Brumskin, Mar.na-tk 

HlK'kk-N. IX-hUi 

Billiard, Charily 
Billiard, \ aiu-ss. 




^0 





Burgess, Arthur 
Bushnell, Kieth 
Butler, Johnnie 
Byers, Avonella 



Byrd, Maurice 
Campell, Tersa 
Carrington, Sharon 
Chandler., Dwight 



Cheatham, Ollene 

Childress, Leroy 

Clarke. Pamella 

Cleveland, Cynthia 





Coit. Ruland 
Cole, David 
Collins, Donell 
Chambliss, Valincia 



Collins, Dorthy 
Cox, Melva 
Cox, Sterling 
Crawford, Robert 



Cue, Priscilla 

Cuffle, Nigel 

Davis. Gregory 

Dawson, William 




Fi-anklin, Marie 

Franks, John 

Frazzier, Annie 

Fullard, Janice 



•*^\A^ ' \ 




Gaiter, Roy 
Gambrell, Katheryn 
Gentry, Sandra 
Gillian, Curtrel 



Godley, David 
Gooden, Rose 
Gray, Carol 
Gray, James 



Gray, Leonard 

Graves, Debra 

Graves, Michael 

Greene, Cynthia 






Green, Kenneth 
Greer, Edith 
Grier, John 
Griffin. Steven 



--:,» ^) ,.^/ t'-:^ 








Gu Hedge, Patty L. 
Hampton, Wesley 
Harris, Darcus 
Henderson, Carolyn 



Henderson, Evangeline 

Henry, Donald 

Hicks, Michell 

Hill, Boyd 








Hubbard, Earl 

Humphrey, Louis 

Irgram, Gloria 

Jackson, Donald 




Johnson, Yvonne 

Johnson, Diane 

Hudson, Dorthy 

Isom, Arthur 



iitti 



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Martin, Althea 

Martin, Gloria 

Mathis, Gregory 

Mayes, Charles 



McCarthy, Alfonso 
McClellan, Savonia 
McCottry, Jonathan 
McKethan, Shirley 





I^Q 



1 'r: 




McPherson, Lorraine 
Meridith, Carole 
Middleton. Frederick 
Miller, Deborah 



Mitchell, Darlene 

Mitchell, Luther 

Monk, Cynthia 

Montgomery, Shela 



f^m 



Moor, Timothy 

Morales, Donald 

Morant, Sam 

Mosley, Jennifer 





7 < 





c^ ^ €i 



Ndson. Valeric 
Ncmbhart. Guy 
O'Garro. Carmella 
O'Neal, Nancy 



Olcy. Mildred 
Parker. Charles 
Parker. Yvonne 
Parramore. Lutherinc 




Pollard. Leslie 
Polite, C\-nthia 
Polote, Edward 
McCulloueh. Rafus 



Christopher, Prince 

Frederick, Sebro 

Selassie, Moqis 

Sessor, Stanley E. 



Sigh. Bettye 

Sigh, Edward 

Simeon, Dale 

Simmons, Gloria 





Simmons, Henry 
Simons, Queen 
Simpson, Beatrice 
S locum b, Joan 



Smith, Debra 

Smith, Dexter 

Smith, Donna 

Smith. Solomon 



Smith, Vanessa 

Stanford, Martha A. 

Stenson, Dwight 

Stevens, Sharon 




Stewart. Brenda 
Stewart, Jamef 
Stewart. Paincia 
Stone. Lmwood 










Taliaferro, William 
Taylor, Aaron 
Taylor, Tony 
Thomas, Arthor Dean 



Thomas, Iris 
Thomas, Leslie 
Toyloy, Luther F. 
Townes, Sharon 



Travis, Gregory 

Trott, Darlene 

Trusty, Leon 

Tynes, Cynthia 





Tynes, Linda 
Tyson, Dan 
Tyrus, Laura 
Wagner, Alonzp 



Waldron, Carole 
Walker, Aloyce 
Walker. Ellyne 
WaUace, Keith 



Waller. Victor 
Washington, Diana 
Washington, Diane 

Watson, Dorla 




^^ 



Weekes, Antony 

Wells, John L. 

White, Debora H. 

Williams, Dwayne 






Wilson, Sylvia 
Woods, Shirley 
Word, Deborah 
Wright, Jocelyn 




Williams. Maurine 
Williamson. Roberto 
Willingham. Eljth 
Willis, Arnold 





Junior 








Class 





Martin. Kaihy Ann 



Seventy-Sixth 
Senior Class 



r\ 



IKI 




B 



Muriel Alford 
B.S. History 



Keith Artis 
B.S. Biology 



B.A. Mathematics 



Jennifer Baile 
A.S. Nursing 



Marilyn Blenman 
B.A. Music 




Judith Bernard 
B.A. English 








Elizabeth Bright 

B.S. Business Education 



Diedra Brooks 
B.S. Speech Pathology 





Stennett Brooks 
B.S. Business 
Administration 



Angela Brown 

B.S. Business 

Administration 





Edward Bryant 
B.A. History 



Minerva Carter 

A.S. Secretarial 

Science 





Corliss Claibon 
B.G.S. Biology 
Chemistry 
Religion 



Michele Cleveland 
B.A. Music 





Paul Cleveland 
B.A. Psychology 



Brenda Cole 

B.S. Special 

Education 








Janice Coopwood 
B.A. English 



Denise Cornelius 

B.S. Business 

.Administration 




211 



Charles Cree 
B.A. Theoloj 



Eulus Dennis 
B.S. Accounting 



Craig Doss 
B.A. Thee 



Richard Evaiu 
B.A. Theolocr 



Cynthia Evai 
B.S. Elemenia 



Samuel Fadare, Jr. 
B.S. Medical 
Technology 




A 



B.A. Theology 





■■^-5iSsr JibC •'>>»« it I '-*.v 



( / -'K \ 



a 



Phillip Giddingt 
B.A. Mod- 
Language. 



Terry Gil 
B.A. Th -■ 



Vcnita Golden 
~.S. Elementary 



y Grimth 
B.S. Elemenurv 



Wendy Griffith 
B.S. Biology 








Wanda Henry 
B.A. Psychology 



Steve Horton 
B.A. Theology 





Igbokwe Igbokwe 
B.A. Business 
Administration, 
Psychology 



Freda James 

B.S. Business 

Administration 






C'liflon Jessup 
B.A. History 



Deadra Johnson 
B.A. Rdigion 





Sarita Johnson 
B.S. Sociology 



Teacher Johnson, Jr. 
B.A. Biology 





Farrell Jones 
B.A. Theology, 
History 





Ada Kirby 
B.S. Business 
Administration 



Joyce Knight 

S. Hlenieniary 

Education 




m t 




'i?^y^ 








B.A. Theology 



Hw^ 



Wayne O'Bannon 

B.S. Business 

Administration 



Joseph Okike 
B.S. Business 
Administration 





Willie Parker 
B.A. Religion 



Anthony Patterson 
B.A. Sociol 




William Penick. Ill 
B.A. Theolo- 



WinUey Phipps 
B.A. Th"-' 



Robert Pressley 
B.S. Business 






i 




Debra Ramey 

A.S. Nursing 



Erroll Reid 
B.A. Theology 





Beverly Robinson 
A.S. Nursing 



Lasia Roga 
B.G.S. 





Stephen Ruff 
B.A. Theology 



Keith Rugless 
B.A. Music 





Elvira Sealey 
B.S. Elementary 
Education 



Janice Shields 
.S. Elementary Education 





Ralph Shipman 
B.S. Psychology 



Emmitt Slocumb. Jr. 
B.A. Theology 





Doctor Smith, Jr. 
B.A. Theology 



Marlene Smith 
A.S. Nursing 





223 



Janice Steven! 
A.S. Nursing 







B.A. Theolog) 




! 



Deborah We 
B.S. Elemen 



1^ 



Esther While 
B.S. Sociology 



Toni White 
A.S. Secretarial 
Science 



f .tt^^f 



Tern Denise White 
B.S. Business Administration 



mi 










Candidates For Degrees May 30, 1976 



Biology, Chemistry 

SAMUEL ADEWOLE ADIGUN DAN I Y AN 
Business Administration, Psychology 

IGBOKWE OKO IGBOKWE 
Elementary Education, Music 

JOYCE LYNETTE KNIGHT 
History, Music 

DANIEL LEROY HILL 
History, Religion 

BARBARA ANN WINFIELD 
Biology 

ESTHER JUANITA ALLEYNE 

ANDRE KEITH ARTIS 

ARLENE F. BRAHAM 

SAMUEL OLA FADARE, JR. 

WENDY A.N. GRIFFITH 

RONALD JEFFREY McCOWAN 

ROBERT BERNARD THOMAS 
Business Administration 

ROBERT J. MACK 

TERRI DENISE WHITE 

LARRY D. WORD 
Chemistry 

VAN BENJAMIN RUNNELS 

ALAN DEXTER SAMPSON 
English 

JANICE LYNN COOPWOOD 

KEITH LAMOND MAJOR 
History 

EDWARD GEORGE BRYANT 

CHRIS L. CARTWRIGHT 

STEPHEN CARLTON FOSTER 

CLIFTON R. JESSUP, JR. 

GEORGE CEDRIC VALENTINE 
Mathematics 

CHERYL JOY AUSTIN 

DEBRA DARLYNE WILSON 

KAREN MARIE WRIGHT 
Music 

MICHELE FLORENCE CLEVELAND 
Psychology 

PAUL RICHARD CLEVELAND 

WANDA GAIL HENRY 
Religion 

ALAN HENRY BARNUM 

SHELLEEN NEDRA HICKS 

DEADRA LORRAINE JOHNSON 

GERALD HANSEL JONES 

WILLIE SAMUEL PARKER 

LESLIE LLOYD WHONDER 
Social Work 

LYNN MARIE DAVIS 
Sociology 

BARRY TYRONE WILKINS 
Theology 

FRANTZ R. BELHOMME 

MARTIN OVERTON BENJAMIN 

WILLL\M H. CHAVERS 

CHARLES EDWARD CREECH 

CRAIG ARTHUR DOSSMAN 

THEODORE J. ELLERBE 

RICHARD ARTHUR EVANS 

DURANDEL LANE FORD 

TERRY DEAN GILES 

CALVIN URIAH HARRISON 

DOCK HATCHER 

JERRY HAYES 

STEVE HORTON 



PHILLIP JERALD JONES 

JOHN S. NIXON 

WILLL\M EDWARD PENICK, III 

WINTLEY AUGUSTUS PHIPPS 

STEPHEN P. RUFF 

EMMITT SLOCUMB, JR. 

DOCTOR SMITH, JR. 

ONEL CREECH TUCKER 

REGINALD WAYNE WASHINGTON 

GIL F. WEBB 

FRANK RONALD WILLIAMS 

J. PHILIP WILLIAMS, II 

Business Administration 

STENNETT H. BROOKS 

DENISE GAIL CORNELIUS 

CHARLES H. DANIELS 

EULUS DENNIS 

FREDA ANN JAMES 

ADA L. KIRBY 

ANDREA KAY LODGE 

AMEELA ANGELA McFARLAND 

WAYNE EDWARD O'BANNON 

JOSEPH UMEZUMBA OKIKE 

ROBERT SAMUEL PRESSLEY 

LARNEY RUTLEDGE, JR. 

RONALD M. SMITH 

LOLA B. WHITE 
Business Education 

ELIZABETH ANN BRIGHT 
Elementary Education 

OMERRER CONSALINA DAWSON, III 

BARYL NADINE DESMUKES 

VERA REGINA FULTON 

VENITA MARL\ GOLDEN 

HENRY CHARLES GRIFFITH 

RUPERTHA PRENTICE 

JANICE DL\NNE SHIELDS 

DEBORAH RENITA WEBSTER 

DONNA LYNN WILLL\MS 
Food and Nutrition 

CHIOMA EZINONA OKORO 

JOYCELYN MUNROE PETERSON 
Psychology 

BRUCE EDWARD WELLS 
Sociology 

ARCHIE ELLIOTT 

CYNTHL\ RENEE POWELL 
Special Education 

BRENDA LOUISE COLE 
Speech Pathology 

DIEDRA YVONNE BROOKS 

DELVIUS ELAINE WAGNER 



BACHELOR OF 
GENERAL STUDIES 

Biology, Chemistry, Religion 

CORLISS REGINA CLAIBON 
English, Modem Language, Sec. Ed. 

PHILLIP EDWARD GIDDINGS 
Biology, Religion, Art 

DOUGLAS E. WILLL\MS 



ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 


Nursing 




JENNIFER MARIE BAILEY 




PAULINA ANNETTE BRENYA 




DOROTHY JOY COLLINS 




FRANCES HALL 




DEADRA LORRAINE JOHNSON 




CYNTHIA LOUISE McCALL 




DEBRA LYNN RAMEY 




DORTLEAN ROLLE 




KEITH ADRAIN RUGLESS 




MARLENE ANN SMITH 




EDNA LEE WINFREY 




Secretarial Science 




ZAYNE URSLA HARDY 




ROSEMARIE EMILY KING 




TONI RENEE WHITE 




Candidates For 


Degrees July 17, 1976 


Theology, History 


MARY M. GIBSON 


FARRELL SIMON JONES 


BERNADETTE JOHNSON 


ERROLL EZIAS REID 


SAVONIA MARGONETTA McCLELLAN 


Business Admin., Theology 


BEVERLY G. ROBINSON 


GEORGE WORTHWIN ST. JOHN 


MARILYN GARNETT KAY WOOTEN 


Biology 


Secretarial Science 


TEACHER SAVAN JOHNSON, JR. 


JANET DENISE CARTER 


RONALD LYNCH 


MINERVA COLLEEN CARTER 


GERALD FRANK WILKINS 




CHERYL ANN ZIMMERMAN 




English 

JUDITH BERNARD 
Mathematics 


Honor Graduates 


SAMUEL MADISON PASCHAL, JR. 




Music 




MARILYN JANET BLENMAN 
GLENN LeROY D'ANDRADE 


Summa Cum Laude 


DEBORAH JEAN ST ARKS 




Religion 


Chfton R. Jessup 


CLEOPHUS CHARLES MIMS 


George Cedric Valentine 


Social Work 


John S. Nixon 


FRANCES HALL 


Diedra Yvonne Brooks 


DEBORAH HOLLAND 


Samuel Adewole Adigun 


ESTHER RUTH WHITE 


Daniyan 


Sociology 


Igbokwe Oko Igbokwe 


JULES MICHAEL SIMEON, JR. 




MARVELLA CORNELIA ALLEN SULLIVAN 
Theology 

MILTON CARTWRIGHT, JR. 


Magna Cum Laude 


CARLYLE GEORGE LANGHORN 




JAMES GORDON LEE, JR. 


Reginal Wayne Washmgton 


CHARLES MILTON WILLIS 


Arlene F. Braham 




Joyce Lynette Knight 


Business Administration 


Coriiss Regina Claibon 


ANGELA ELAINE BROWN 


Dorothy Collins 


MICHAEL JOSEPH REED 


Andrea Kaye Lodge 




Frances Hall 


Business Education 


J, Philip Williams. II 


LIZBETH DARLENE THORPE 


Lola B. White 


Elementary Education 




ROYE ANN BROWN 
ELVIRA SEALEY 


Cum Laude 


Food and Nutrition 




CAROLYN JESSIE JACKSON 


Alan Dexter Sampson 


Psychology 


Eulus Dennis 


EDITH VANESSA DARBY 


Gerald Hansel Jones 


JAMESETTA SHARON GANTT 


Debra Darl\Tie Wilson 


JASHER CALEB MAIS 


Deborah Jc;m Angela Starks 


JACQUELINE GAIL MIDDLETON 


Freda Ann J;imes 


JERRY MONROE 


Barbara .Ann Wmt'ield 


FREDA YVONNE NEAL 


Leslie Llo\d W bonder 


Bible Instructorship 


DeK^rah Renita \\ ebster 


PATRICIA ANN WILLIAMS 


Brenda Louise Cole 


Nursing 


Frantz R. Belhomme 


HENRY STANISLAUS BROWN 


Michele F. Cleveland 



Precious Memories 



JJ 



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